Nov
25
8:00 AM08:00

Volunteer trip November 25, 2017

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“When thinking in terms of years, plant seeds; in terms of decades, plant trees; but when thinking in terms of centuries, teach people.”- Confucius
 
Hawai`i is one of the finest places to live on the planet. Each of us receives gifts from Maui's natural world daily in the quality of the water we enjoy, the air we breathe, and the rare beauty that surrounds us. The weekend following Thanksgiving provides the perfect opportunity for us to head mauka, plant more trees and appreciate Haleakala and her mountain forests. 

Saturday November 25, 2017, were heading back up to Auwahi.

On our volunteer trips to Auwahi forest, we work as a team to plant native seedlings, pull weeds, and gather seeds. Respectfully, for your safety and the safety of others, if you have any pertinent medical or physical conditions that would affect your ability to engage in this type of fieldwork please consider these factors carefully when offering to volunteer at Auwahi.

Reservations are mandatory. To request a seat in one of our 4WD vehicles, please send us a note to volunteer@auwahi.orgWe will respond to your request by Monday, November 20. 

Where: Meet at ʻUlupalakua Ranch Store. Please park behind store, bring all your gear, and we will head up by 4WD up to the restored forest at Auwahi

When: Saturday, November 25, 2017   8:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Located on and sponsored by `Ulupalakua Ranch, the Auwahi Project (www.auwahi.org) protects one of the last diverse tracts of dryland forest in the archipelago. We are a community based project, in large part, dependent on the contributions of the public, especially in terms of volunteerism for tree planting and other aspects of forest management. 

Due to the rough and steep terrain, we require hiking boots that cover the ankle, and unfortunately, we will have to turn folks away without proper boots. We have some extra boots you can borrow but please bring your own socks. Plan to pack layered clothing, rain gear, two liters of water, lunch, sunscreen and a hat. Please clean all your gear, backpacks and boots to leave hitchhiking seeds behind.

As usual, before leaving the ranch we will be decontaminating our boots with brushes to help prevent the spread of invasive plants and using alcohol to avoid the potential spread of rapid `ōhi`a death (ROD) and other potential pathogens that can threaten our native Hawaiian forests. 

Mahalo no,

Auwahi Forest Restoration `ohana
 

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Nov
2
5:00 PM17:00

Talk Story Thursday with Art Medeiros Ph.D at the Hui No`eau Visual Art Center

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Auwahi Forest Restoration Project

Talk Story Thursday with Art Medeiros Ph.D. 

Hui No`eau Visual Arts Center, 2481 Baldwin Ave. Makawao, HI 96768
November 2, 2017
5pm-6pm
Free Admission

E komo mai

“Our ability to perceive quality in nature begins as in art with the pretty. It expands through successive stages of the beautiful to values as yet uncaptured by language. The quality of cranes lies, I think, in this higher gamut, as yet beyond the reach of words.”- Aldo Leopold

Next week Thursday November 2nd, Art Medeiros Ph.D. will be speaking at the Hui No`eau from 5-6pm about Hawai`iʻs native plants and animals centering around this years wonderful art submissions from the Maui community. The Mālama Wao Akua show is one of the finest art shows focusing on Hawai`iʻs native biota. Maui can be especially proud of all the wonderful contributions its' artists submitted this year. This is a great opportunity to no only honor talented local artists but to gain scientific insight into Mauiʻs native biota, important conservation work being done in Hawai`i, and ways to get involved.

For more information on the Mālama Wao Akua exhibit and the ʻTalk Storyʻ series, sponsored by the East Maui Watershed Partnership, click on the link below:

http://eastmauiwatershed.org/event/talk-story-thursday-with-art-medeiros/

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Aug
12
8:00 AM08:00

Volunteer trip August 12, 2017

Last week the Erdman family and `Ulupalakua Ranch were honored by the US Fish and Wildlife Service, the Natural Resource Conservation Service, and the Auwahi Forest Restoration Project for an unprecedented two decades of commitment to meaningful diverse forest restoration at Auwahi. A plaque was presented and afterwards a rare māhoe seedling planted. Though the ecological successes and the extensive community participation at Auwahi often receive the bulk of attention, what is lost for many is that the restoration work we do at Auwahi forest is occurring on a working cattle ranch and is only possible because of the Erdman family’s support.
 
After 20 years, one of the greatest achievements of the Auwahi project is the return of native seedlings of diverse species reappearing in the recovering forest understory. To ecologists, this is like hearing a heartbeat getting louder; a sign of health. With our help and any luck, the seedlings that are germinating now will live for hundreds of years, outliving all of us, even probably outliving the plaque. What this generation can be proud of is that because of our communal efforts and the Erdman’s support, we are the generation responsible for this. In many ways, the return of these seedlings is the real award.

On our volunteer trips to Auwahi forest, we work as a team to plant native seedlings, pull weeds, and gather seeds. Respectfully, for your safety and the safety of others, if you have any pertinent medical or physical conditions that would affect your ability to engage in this type of fieldwork please consider these factors carefully when offering to volunteer at Auwahi. To request a seat in one of our 4x4 vehicles, please send us a note at volunteer@auwahi.org.

Located on and sponsored by `Ulupalakua Ranch, the Auwahi Project (www.auwahi.org) protects one of the last diverse tracts of dryland forest in the archipelago. We are a community based project, in large part, dependent on the contributions of the public, especially in terms of volunteerism for tree planting and other aspects of forest management. 

As usual, before leaving the ranch we will be decontaminating our boots with brushes to help prevent the spread of invasive plants and using alcohol to avoid the potential spread of rapid `ōhi`a death (ROD) and other potential pathogens that can threaten our native Hawaiian forests. 

Where: ʻUlupalakua Ranch Store     

When: Saturday, August 12, 2017    8:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Due to the rough and steep terrain, WE REQUIRE HIKING BOOTS TO BE WORN THAT COVER THE ANKLE, and unfortunately, we will have to turn folks away without proper boots. We have some extra boots you can borrow but please bring your own socks. Plan to pack layered clothing, rain gear, two liters of water, lunch, sunscreen and a hat. Please clean all your gear, backpacks and boots to leave hitchhiking seeds behind.

We have a limited number of 4x4 drive vehicles and, as a result, limited room for volunteers. Please don't let this discourage you from signing up but we do ask for your understanding for not being able to accommodate everyone who wants to volunteer.
 

Mahalo no,
 

Auwahi Forest Restoration `ohana

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Jul
1
8:00 AM08:00

Volunteer trip July 1, 2017

As our volunteer community changes and grows, we wanted to acknowledge the passing of one of our Auwahi `ohana, Richard Nakagawa. For those of you who knew Richard, you know he was exceptionally humble, caring, and passionate. Richard was an early force in the protection of Auwahi forest when the very fate of the forest lay in the balance.   At a time when Auwahi volunteer trips were particularly physical, Richard’s bright spirit, hard working style, and cackling laugh that everyone knew, buoyed up and made those first work trips something memorable. For all that he gave to Hawaiian plants and to the people around him, Richard’s spirit will always reside in Auwahi forest and in our hearts and memories.  

As our volunteer community changes and grows, we wanted to acknowledge the passing of one of our Auwahi `ohana, Richard Nakagawa. For those of you who knew Richard, you know he was exceptionally humble, caring, and passionate. Richard was an early force in the protection of Auwahi forest when the very fate of the forest lay in the balance.
 
At a time when Auwahi volunteer trips were particularly physical, Richard’s bright spirit, hard working style, and cackling laugh that everyone knew, buoyed up and made those first work trips something memorable. For all that he gave to Hawaiian plants and to the people around him, Richard’s spirit will always reside in Auwahi forest and in our hearts and memories.
 

On Saturday July 1st, we are heading back up to Auwahi to malama our native forests. This time we are focusing on the less glamorous job of controlling some of the invasive plant species that threaten Auwahi forest. As a result, this trip will definitely be rougher, scratchier, and more physical than our normal tree planting trips. Please consider this in requesting a seat for this trip.

On our volunteer trips to Auwahi forest, we work as a team to plant native seedlings, pull weeds, and gather seeds. Respectfully, for your safety and the safety of others, if you have any pertinent medical or physical conditions that would affect your ability to engage in this type of fieldwork please consider these factors carefully when offering to volunteer at Auwahi. To request a seat in one of our 4x4 vehicles, please send us a note at volunteer@auwahi.org.

Located on and sponsored by `Ulupalakua Ranch, the Auwahi Project (www.auwahi.org) protects one of the last diverse tracts of dryland forest in the archipelago. We are a community based project, in large part, dependent on the contributions of the public, especially in terms of volunteerism for tree planting and other aspects of forest management. 

As usual, before leaving the ranch we will be decontaminating our boots with brushes to help prevent the spread of invasive plants and using alcohol to avoid the potential spread of rapid `ōhi`a death (ROD) and other potential pathogens that can threaten our native Hawaiian forests. 

Where: ʻUlupalakua Ranch Store     

When: Saturday, July 1, 2017    8:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Due to the rough and steep terrain, WE REQUIRE HIKING BOOTS TO BE WORN THAT COVER THE ANKLE, and unfortunately, we will have to turn folks away without proper boots. We have some extra boots you can borrow but please bring your own socks. Plan to pack layered clothing, rain gear, two liters of water, lunch, sunscreen and a hat. Please clean all your gear, backpacks and boots to leave hitchhiking seeds behind.

We have a limited number of 4x4 drive vehicles and, as a result, limited room for volunteers. Please don't let this discourage you from signing up but we do ask for your understanding for not being able to accommodate everyone who wants to volunteer.
 

Mahalo no,
 

Auwahi Forest Restoration `ohana

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Jun
17
8:00 AM08:00

Volunteer Trip- June 17, 2017

Auwahi volunteer trip- June 17, 2017 (If interested in coming please email us at volunteer@auwahi.org)

"A society is no better than its woods"- W. H. Audens
 
In ancient Rajasthan, India, it is said 363 villagers lost their lives protecting a grove of sacred khejri trees from being cut down for materials for the maharajah's palace. Today, with our busy lives, our relationship with the native trees of our lands is much more ambiguous.
 
And yet, daily, native trees of our lands offer invaluable natural resources and provide essential life-giving services. Native trees bind the soils, regulate nutrient cycling, capture and process our waters, give us shade and beauty, as well as provide ethnobotanical materials and cultural identity.
 
We are heading back up in two weeks to complete the planting of the last 300 of this season’s batch of beautiful maua (Xylosma hawaiiense) seedlings at Auwahi. A lot of these will go where we were last trip, the upper eastern section of A2 forest area. This area is probably a little thicker, scratchier, rockier and rougher to traverse than some of the areas we plant in so please bear that in mind if you want to go on this trip. Otherwise, we look forward to hearing from you and promise to get back to you by this coming Friday, June 9th, if we can reserve you a seat in a 4WD vehicle.
 
Located on and sponsored by `Ulupalakua Ranch, the Auwahi Project (www.auwahi.org) protects one of the last diverse tracts of dryland forest in the archipelago. We are a community based project, in large part, dependent on the contributions of the public, especially in terms of volunteerism for tree planting and other aspects of forest management. 

As usual, before leaving the ranch we will be decontaminating our boots with brushes to help prevent the spread of invasive plants and using alcohol to avoid the potential spread of rapid `ōhi`a death (ROD) and potentially other pathogens that can threaten our native Hawaiian forests. 

Where: ʻUlupalakua Ranch Store     

 

When: Saturday, June 17, 2017    8:00 AM - 4:00 PM

 

Due to the rough and steep terrain, WE REQUIRE HIKING BOOTS TO BE WORN THAT COVER THE ANKLE, and unfortunately, we will have to turn folks away without proper boots. We have some extra boots you can borrow but please bring your own socks. Plan to pack layered clothing, rain gear, two liters of water, lunch, sunscreen and a hat. Please clean all your gear, backpacks and boots to leave hitchhiking seeds behind.
 

We have a limited number of 4wheel drive vehicles and, as a result, limited room for volunteers. Please don't let this discourage you from signing up but we do ask for your understanding for not being able to accommodate everyone who wants to volunteer.
 

Mahalo no,
 

Auwahi Forest Restoration `ohana

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May
20
8:00 AM08:00

Volunteer Trip- May 20, 2017

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Auwahi volunteer trip
Saturday May 20, 2017


Though increasingly rare, maua remains a beautiful and conspicuous component of leeward slopes of most of the main Hawaiian islands. The pink, magenta, and chartreuse liko (young leaves) of the maua gathered in the canopies of large trees seasonally create some of the most striking and colorful displays of Hawaiian forests.

Ethnobotanically, virtually nothing has been documented about the uses of maua (Xylosma hawaiiense) by the early Hawaiians save for a reference in an early dictionary as a favored wood for poi boards. As the tree produces hard, durable wood, this lack of documentation of usage likely reflects the relatively poor state of knowledge capture during the late 1700s and early 1800s. On Maui, a second name has been recorded, a’e, though this name is also shared by other tree species.
 

On southern Haleakala, maua grows in the wild from Kanaio, with its smaller, more bonsai shrubby trees, to the larger 30 foot individuals that thrive in the richer soils of Auwahi and Luala’ilua. Thanks to Anna Palomino’s magic touch, we have an unprecedented batch ofmaua seedling that need your help on May 20th, in being returned to their native home.  If you have the time, please consider joining us.

 
As usual, before leaving the ranch we will be decontaminating our boots with brushes to help prevent the spread of invasive plants and using alcohol to avoid the potential spread of rapid `ōhi`a death (ROD) and potentially other pathogens that can threaten our native Hawaiian forests. 

 Where: ʻUlupalakua Ranch Store     

 

When: Saturday, May 20, 2017    8:00 AM - 4:00 PM

 

Due to the rough and steep terrain, WE REQUIRE HIKING BOOTS TO BE WORN THAT COVER THE ANKLE, and unfortunately, we will have to turn folks away without proper boots. We have some extra boots you can borrow but please bring your own socks. Plan to pack layered clothing, rain gear, two liters of water, lunch, sunscreen and a hat. Please clean all your gear, backpacks and boots to leave hitchhiking seeds behind.
 

We have a limited number of 4wheel drive vehicles and, as a result, limited room for volunteers. Please don't let this discourage you from signing up but we do ask for your understanding for not being able to accommodate everyone who wants to volunteer.
 

Mahalo no,
 

Auwahi Forest Restoration `ohana

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