Sep
29
8:00 AM08:00

Volunteer trip September 29, 2018

unnamed (2).jpg

Lost water from lost forests


What would happen if we could use evolving ecological restoration techniques, like those implemented at Auwahi, to restore Kula’s lost watershed forests from ‘Ulupalakua to Makawao? How much more water would be harnessed?  How much more habitat for native plants and animals created?
 
With our community-based volunteer trips, the Auwahi project restores diverse native dry forests above ‘Ulupalakua, some of the last living habitat of Hawai’i’s rarest biocultural treasures. Here, populations of native plants are being stabilized and endangered species beginning to thrive.
 
But does this type of native forest restoration really ‘jump start’ regional aquifers and help restore aquifer function?
 
In 2010, a collaborative study was initiated at Auwahi with the US Geological Survey with support from Maui County’s Department of Water Supply where scientists began to investigate this question.
 
In work potentially critical for future residents of Maui, this research documented that restoring forests at Auwahi actually does restore aquifer health. The data surprised participating hydrologists, who noted that the return of aquifer function happened at a much quicker rate than they would have otherwise predicted.
 
Data from this collaboration led to two peer-reviewed publications (full citations and links below), one of which was nationally recognized by both the American Geophysical Union and the US Geological Survey as documenting globally important findings.

 
Effects of native forest restoration on soil hydraulic properties, Auwahi, Maui, Hawaiian Islands. (Perkins, K. S., J. R. Nimmo, and A. C. Medeiros. 2012. Geophysical Research Letters 39: L05405. doi:10.1029/2012GL051120)

Assessing effects of native forest restoration on soil moisture dynamics and potential aquifer recharge, Auwahi, Maui. Ecohydrology. (Perkins, K. S., J. R. Nimmo, A. C. Medeiros, D.J. Szutu, and E.I. von Allmen. 2014. doi: 10.1002/eco.1469)
 
Join us for our next volunteer trip to Auwahi forest on Saturday September 29, 2018.
                                                 
Due to limited seating, please understand that confirmation of your reservation is required for you to attend. To request a seat, send us a note to volunteer@auwahi.org.
 
Where: Meet at `Ulupalakua Ranch Store. Please park behind store and bring all your gear.
 
When: Saturday, September 29, 2018  8:00 AM ~ 4:00 PM
 
What to bring: Due to the rough and steep terrain, we require hiking boots that cover the ankle, and unfortunately, we will have to turn folks away without proper boots. We have some extra boots you can borrow but please bring your own socks. Long pants are also recommended to protect against the dense brush. Please bring a back pack with layered clothing, rain gear, two liters of water, lunch, sunscreen and a hat. Coolers are not advised because of the rugged terrain we need to traverse to do our work. Please clean all your gear, backpacks and boots to leave hitchhiking seeds behind.
 
Located on and sponsored by `Ulupalakua Ranch, the Auwahi Project (www.auwahi.org) protects one of the last diverse tracts of dryland forest in the archipelago. We are a community based project, in large part, dependent on the contributions of the public, especially in terms of volunteerism for tree planting and other aspects of forest management. 

As usual, before leaving the ranch we will be decontaminating our boots with brushes to help prevent the spread of invasive plants and using alcohol to avoid the potential spread of rapid `ōhi`a death (ROD) and other possible pathogens that can threaten our native Hawaiian forests. 

Mahalo no,
Auwahi Forest Restoration `ohana

View Event →

Jul
28
8:00 AM08:00

Grafica Auwahi and July 28 volunteer trip

unnamed.jpg

Grafica Auwahi

 
Over the past few months, it has been an honor for all of us in the Auwahi Project to work with renowned international artist Mazatl in preparation for his Grafica Auwahi installation at the Hui No`eau Visual Art Center.
 
In lieu of individual canvas works, Mazatl painted all four walls and the ceiling using his distinctive black and white printmaker style. With this technique, he has transformed the history room at the Hui into something visually stunning and emotionally touching. Using the native Hawaiian crow, the `alalā (Corvushawaiiensis), and the invasive black rat (Rattus rattus), Mazatl has created a powerful statement about the erosion of Hawaiian nature and culture as well as their renaissance through ecological and cultural restoration.
 
Grafica Auwahi will be on display at the Hui No’eau Visual Arts Center for the next year or so. 

To see more of Mazatl’s work, visit http://www.graficamazatl.com/
 
Join us for our next volunteer trip to Auwahi forest on Saturday July 28, 2018.
                                                 
Due to limited seating, please understand that confirmation of your reservation is required for you to attend. To request a seat, send us a note to volunteer@auwahi.org.
 
Where: Meet at `Ulupalakua Ranch Store. Please park behind store and bring all your gear.
 
When: Saturday, July 28, 2018  8:00 AM ~ 4:00 PM
 
What to bring: Due to the rough and steep terrain, we require hiking boots that cover the ankle, and unfortunately, we will have to turn folks away without proper boots. We have some extra boots you can borrow but please bring your own socks. Long pants are also recommended to protect against the dense brush. Please bring a back pack with layered clothing, rain gear, two liters of water, lunch, sunscreen and a hat. Coolers are not advised because of the rugged terrain we need to traverse to do our work. Please clean all your gear, backpacks and boots to leave hitchhiking seeds behind.
 
Located on and sponsored by `Ulupalakua Ranch, the Auwahi Project (www.auwahi.org) protects one of the last diverse tracts of dryland forest in the archipelago. We are a community based project, in large part, dependent on the contributions of the public, especially in terms of volunteerism for tree planting and other aspects of forest management. 

As usual, before leaving the ranch we will be decontaminating our boots with brushes to help prevent the spread of invasive plants and using alcohol to avoid the potential spread of rapid `ōhi`a death (ROD) and other possible pathogens that can threaten our native Hawaiian forests. 

Mahalo no,
Auwahi Forest Restoration `ohana

View Event →
Jun
30
to Aug 1

'Wahi Pana Auwahi' ART EXHIBITION

  • Hui No`eau Visual Arts Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Hui No‘eau and the Auwahi Forest Restoration Project are thrilled to collaborate with Mazatl, the Hui’s 2018 Artist in Residence, and Maui's talented local artists to bring the forest to the people through art. 

The main exhibition features four realms of Auwahi:

1.     Auwahi before humans

2.     Auwahi, wahi pana for the people of old

3.     The destruction of Auwahi forest

4.     The rebirth of Auwahi forest through the hands of the community

 

 

View Event →
Jun
23
8:00 AM08:00

Volunteer trip June 23, 2018

unnamed (4).jpg

Kau wela (summer) at Auwahi 


Every year, the southern slopes of Haleakalā go through a marked seasonal progression, ‘the drying’, well known to all the ranchers on that side of the mountain. Beginning in the fall, the winds shift frequently and thick dark clouds and lashing rain are frequent companions on that side of the mountain. Then summer comes on with long days, clear skies, and abundant sun. With no rain, the scene quickly shifts, sometimes in days, and some of the native biota, which are specialists at this, go into a quiescent stage similar to the dormancy of deciduous trees in temperate climates.
 
Doryopteris decipiens, also known as kumu-niumanawahua and `iwa`iwa, is a native fern species found at Auwahi. As pictured above, this fern is tuned in to and responds quite precisely to the comings and goings of rain on the lava fields of southern Haleakalā. 

Amazingly, these two images were taken only 12 days apart of the same kumu-niufern. The last photo was taken this week, displaying completely withered foliage in preparation for summer at Auwahi.
 
Saturday, June 23 we invite you to join us on another volunteer trip to Auwahi forest. 

Due to limited seating, please understand that confirmation of your reservation is required for you to attend. To request a seat, send us a note to volunteer@auwahi.org.
 
Where: Meet at `Ulupalakua Ranch Store. Please park behind store and bring all your gear.
 
When: Saturday, June 23, 2018  8:00 AM ~ 4:00 PM
 
What to bring: Due to the rough and steep terrain, we require hiking boots that cover the ankle, and unfortunately, we will have to turn folks away without proper boots. We have some extra boots you can borrow but please bring your own socks. Long pants are also recommended to protect against the dense brush. Please bring a back pack with layered clothing, rain gear, two liters of water, lunch, sunscreen and a hat. Coolers are not advised because of the rugged terrain we need to traverse to do our work. Please clean all your gear, backpacks and boots to leave hitchhiking seeds behind.
 
Located on and sponsored by `Ulupalakua Ranch, the Auwahi Project (www.auwahi.org) protects one of the last diverse tracts of dryland forest in the archipelago. We are a community based project, in large part, dependent on the contributions of the public, especially in terms of volunteerism for tree planting and other aspects of forest management. 

As usual, before leaving the ranch we will be decontaminating our boots with brushes to help prevent the spread of invasive plants and using alcohol to avoid the potential spread of rapid `ōhi`a death (ROD) and other possible pathogens that can threaten our native Hawaiian forests. 

Mahalo no,
Auwahi Forest Restoration `ohana

 

unnamed (6).jpg
View Event →
Jun
11
8:00 AM08:00

Volunteer trip June 11, 2018

unnamed (2).jpg

the starting point


Driven by accelerated levels of fire and the impacts of invasive non-native plants and animals beginning around 1000-1500 A.D., vast tracts of lowland native forests that formerly cloaked the leeward slopes of the Hawaiian Islands have disappeared, metamorphosing the land to a degree that few of us can probably imagine.

Extinction is not always about rare things becoming rarer. Sometimes, it is about the incredibly common species somehow reduced to the last individuals, such as the Passenger pigeon (Ectopistes migratorius) of the Eastern United Sates which was once so abundant it darkened the skies but is now extinct. In some sense, somehow this type of extinction seems more tragic, more of a warning sign.

In a similar fashion, the once common Hawaiian tree species mēhamehame(Flueggea neowawraea) has tragically been reduced to only four known wild individuals on Maui, all on southern Haleakalā. At this point, mēhamehame is among the worlds’ rarest trees and dangerously close to extinction.
 
Two of Maui’s last four trees occur on a small isolated `a`a flow in lower Auwahi and are the focus of the Auwahi project’s new lower elevation restoration area. Recently, we discovered that this regional population had been much larger, with the identification of six additional dead mēhamehame trees nearby on the flow, based on distinctive wood characteristics. Dr. Art Medeiros, Project Manager, speculates that these few remaining mēhamehame trees are the last representatives of what must have been thousands or more growing in the thick native forests adjoining the flow before they were ever impacted by fire and invasive species. 
 
Ecological restoration is the evolving practice of renewing and restoring degraded, damaged, or destroyed ecosystems and habitats in the environment by active human intervention.  This small population of mēhamehame in Auwahi offers a starting point for a highly endangered native Hawaiian tree species to make a last stand.
 
Come join us Monday, June 11th, to lend a hand in removing invasive species at the kipuka in lower Auwahi that contains these two remaining mēhamehame trees.
 
Special note: This work is likely to be a bit tougher and scratchier than our normal trips, with particularly challenging, rugged `a`a rubble for footing. This time more than others, please no one with ankle, knee, hip, or back problems.
 
Due to limited seating, please understand that confirmation of your reservation is required for you to attend. To request a seat, send us a note to volunteer@auwahi.org.
 
Where: Meet at `Ulupalakua Ranch Store. Please park behind store and bring all your gear.
 
When: Monday, June 11, 2018  8:00 AM ~ 4:00 PM
 
What to bring: Due to the rough and steep terrain, we require hiking boots that cover the ankle, and unfortunately, we will have to turn folks away without proper boots. We have some extra boots you can borrow but please bring your own socks. Long pants are also recommended to protect against the dense brush. Please bring a back pack with layered clothing, rain gear, two liters of water, lunch, sunscreen and a hat. Coolers are not advised because of the rugged terrain we need to traverse to do our work. Please clean all your gear, backpacks and boots to leave hitchhiking seeds behind.
 
Located on and sponsored by `Ulupalakua Ranch, the Auwahi Project (www.auwahi.org) protects one of the last diverse tracts of dryland forest in the archipelago. We are a community based project, in large part, dependent on the contributions of the public, especially in terms of volunteerism for tree planting and other aspects of forest management. 

As usual, before leaving the ranch we will be decontaminating our boots with brushes to help prevent the spread of invasive plants and using alcohol to avoid the potential spread of rapid `ōhi`a death (ROD) and other possible pathogens that can threaten our native Hawaiian forests. 

Mahalo no,
Auwahi Forest Restoration `ohana

View Event →
May
26
8:00 AM08:00

Volunteer trip May 26, 2018

Po`olā


Culturally and ethnobotanically, some native Hawaiian plants are like deep `umeke (calabashes), with what is inside them nearly completely unknown. The po’olā (Claoxylon sandwicensis) is one of these. Ancient Hawaiians had superb ethnobotanical abilities, using many or even most native species for specific purposes. The name used for this uncommon mountain plant is very specific, used for no other plant species in the islands, seeming to symbolize some usage or significance, yet any specific ethnobotany has been lost without documentation.
 
The name po’olā translates literally to ‘sun head’, and is also used specifically for one life stage of the ‘ama’ama, or mullet, an important food fish for the people of old. Another Hawaiian name recorded for this species on Kaua`i island is laukea. Uses and stories associated with this mountain plant are all but unknown. Malcolm Naea Chun (1994, Must We Wait in Despair - The 1867 Report of The `Ahahui L`au Lapa`au of Wailuku, Maui on Native Hawaiian Health.  First People`s Productions, Honolulu, Hawai`i, 318 pp.), translating early manuscripts, reports the only recorded ethnobotanical use of the species with the bark and leaves of po`olā used in the treatment of an undetermined sickness. 
 
Po’olā are interesting, soft wooded shrub-trees of markedly diverse, native leeward forests of the main Hawaiian Islands. The species is dioecious, meaning that there are separate male and female plants, and it also appears to be one of the few Hawaiian plants pollinated by wind. One beautiful characteristic of the species, perhaps unique among the native Hawaiian flora, is their pollen, bright blue at maturity (photo above). Another peculiar characteristic is the almost blue hue in their foliage which becomes even stronger as the leaves are dried, such as in pressed specimens.
 
The po’olā shrub-tree is still found at Auwahi forest today, with less than 100 individuals scattered throughout the district.
 

Come join us next week Saturday, May 26 for a special trip to Auwahi forest. With the 'Wahi PanaAuwahi' art exhibition at the Hui No`eau just around the corner, artists are encouraged to attend! 

Due to limited seating, please understand that confirmation of your reservation is required for you to attend. To request a seat, send us a note to volunteer@auwahi.org and we will respond to your request by Monday, May 21. 
 

Where: Meet at ʻUlupalakua Ranch Store. Please park behind store and bring all your gear.

When: Saturday, May 26, 2018  8:00 AM ~ 4:00 PM

What to bring: Due to the rough and steep terrain, we require hiking boots that cover the ankle, and unfortunately, we will have to turn folks away without proper boots. We have some extra boots you can borrow but please bring your own socks. Long pants are also recommended to protect against the dense understory brush. Please bring a back pack with layered clothing rain gear, two liters of water, lunch, sunscreen and a hat. Please clean all your gear, backpacks and boots to leave hitchhiking seeds behind.

 

Located on and sponsored by `Ulupalakua Ranch, the Auwahi Project (www.auwahi.org) protects one of the last diverse tracts of dryland forest in the archipelago. We are a community based project, in large part, dependent on the contributions of the public, especially in terms of volunteerism for tree planting and other aspects of forest management. 

As usual, before leaving the ranch we will be decontaminating our boots with brushes to help prevent the spread of invasive plants and using alcohol to avoid the potential spread of rapid `ōhi`a death (ROD) and other potential pathogens that can threaten our native Hawaiian forests. 

Mahalo no,

Auwahi Forest Restoration `ohana

View Event →
May
18
to May 26

Wahi Pana Auwahi

artist.jpg

Call to Artists

Art is an important force, translating and shaping our human world. When combined with nature, it becomes especially powerful and evocative, rooted in our ancestral beginnings as a species.

We are excited and honored to announce a call to artists for a juried art show titled 'Wahi Pana Auwahi' being held at the Hui No`eau Visual Arts Center, upcountry Maui this summer. 

Artists are invited to explore and share the social, cultural, and biological aspects of what saving a Hawaiian forest at Auwahi invokes. Ecological restoration is a relatively new and exciting type of applied science where not only forest tracts are brought back to life, but that in the doing so, the human community itself is restored and renewed.
 
The exhibit will showcase four different realms of Auwahi forest:

  1. Auwahi before humans
  2. Auwahi, wahi pana for the people of old
  3. The destruction of Auwahi forest
  4. The rebirth of Auwahi forest through the hands of the community

Please visit our website www.auwahi.org for more information on the forest at Auwahi. 

The show will debut on Family Day June 30th on the Hui No’eau galleries and grounds. All works must be submitted by June 19 for review by the jury selection committee.

To start the process of getting involved, check out the Hui’s website https://www.huinoeau.com/exhibitions/2018/6/wahi-pana-auwahi for further instructions and entry forms.

To sign up for one of our artists trips to Auwahi forest, attend a volunteer trip for inspiration, or for more specific information, just send us an email at volunteer@auwahi.org
 
Please share this post to anyone or group you think might be interested in participating!!! 

View Event →
May
12
8:00 AM08:00

Volunteer trip May 12, 2018

unnamed.jpg

Hōlei and Hawaiian canoes


What may be hard for nearly all of us to understand is that the rare relict tree species at Auwahi were once so common that they played important roles in people’s everyday lives.

Have you ever noticed that Hawaiian canoes are almost invariably painted yellow along their rims?  Did you know that there's a connection between that yellow and one of the rarest native trees in Hawaiʻi, one that still grows at Auwahi?
 
The tree in question is the beautiful hōlei (Ochrosia haleakalae)...

An evaluation made of the Hawaiian fishing industry in 1903, though somewhat long, is shared here nearly in its entirety because it is so interesting! Note: some of the scientific names used them have changed since then, so don’t get thrown by that.


The native Hawaiians in fishing use canoes exclusively. Some of these, particularly the older ones, are very handsome in design and workmanship, the old-time native boat builders having been especially expert.

The body of the canoe is usually hollowed out of the trunk of a koa tree (Acacia koa), which averages from 50 to 60 feet in height. This tree, formerly quite common, is now rather scarce, owing to the excessive demands made upon the supply for canoe building and other purposes. After the tree has been cut down and the branches stripped off, the trunk is cut to the desired length and roughly hewn into shape, then brought down to the shore, where the final touches are given. After the body of the canoe is finished a rim about 6 inches in height is fastened to the upper part by means of wooden nails.

The hōlei (Ochrosia sandwicensis), a tree from 6 to 12 feet in height, is preferred for this purpose, but the ahakea (Bobea elatior), a tree 20 to 30 feet in height, is sometimes used. The wiliwili (Erythrina monosperma), a tree 20 to 25 feet in height, is generally employed in constructing the outrigger, the object of which is to balance the canoe, which is very narrow.... The natives make long journeys in them, frequently in quite stormy weather.”

 

Come join us next week Saturday, May 12 in protecting one of the last remaining homes for hōlei in the archipelago.

Due to limited seating, please understand that confirmation of your reservation is required for you to attend. To request a seat, send us a note to volunteer@auwahi.org and we will respond to your request by Monday, May 7. 

Where: Meet at ʻUlupalakua Ranch Store. Please park behind store and bring all your gear.

When: Saturday, May 12, 2018  8:00 AM ~4:00 PM

What to bring: Due to the rough and steep terrain, we require hiking boots that cover the ankle, and unfortunately, we will have to turn folks away without proper boots. We have some extra boots you can borrow but please bring your own socks. Long pants are also recommended to protect against the dense understory brush. Please bring a back pack with layered clothing rain gear, two liters of water, lunch, sunscreen and a hat. Please clean all your gear, backpacks and boots to leave hitchhiking seeds behind.

Located on and sponsored by `Ulupalakua Ranch, the Auwahi Project (www.auwahi.org) protects one of the last diverse tracts of dryland forest in the archipelago. We are a community based project, in large part, dependent on the contributions of the public, especially in terms of volunteerism for tree planting and other aspects of forest management. 

As usual, before leaving the ranch we will be decontaminating our boots with brushes to help prevent the spread of invasive plants and using alcohol to avoid the potential spread of rapid `ōhi`a death (ROD) and other potential pathogens that can threaten our native Hawaiian forests. 

Mahalo no,

Auwahi Forest Restoration `ohana

View Event →
Apr
7
8:00 AM08:00

Volunteer trip April 7, 2018

group.jpg

The water resources, upon which our human species is entirely dependent, are under siege. By 2025, The World Health Organization predicts that half of the world’s population will be living in areas considered ʻwater-stressed’. Oncoming climate change will further reduce harvested rainwater amounts. 
 
The native forests of Hawai`i are not only the last refuge for native plants and animals, but the source of our water - an especially critical resource on isolated, highly populated islands.
 
Before humans arrived on Maui 1,000-1,400 years ago, dense native forests covered much of the island and in many areas literally fell into the sea. The loss of native forests has been most catastrophic on leeward slopes, where the combined influences of fire, introduced grazing and browsing animals, and invasive weeds, have reduced formerly expansive forest landscapes to 2.5% of their former extent.
 
What is clear is that we are at a critical time in Maui and Hawai’i's history. Watershed partnerships statewide struggle with largely inadequate resources to hold the line on the loss of our native upland forests. With a relatively limited toolbox of conservation techniques, land managers are dealing with increasingly complicated problems that require new and creative solutions.
 
A call to action to protect our watershed forests is needed. Whether it is this, or a future generation, the prosperity of Hawai`i depends on our native forests.

Saturday, April 7th, we will continue our efforts to restore Maui’s dryland forests.
 
On our volunteer trips to Auwahi forest, we work as a team to plant native seedlings, pull weeds, and gather seeds. This particular trip though is going to be a little bit more physically challenging with more up and downs, uneven terrain, more bush crashing.

To volunteer with our program requires that you are in reasonably good physical condition with no major medical issues (heart conditions, asthma, bee allergies, diabetes, pregnancy, physical injuries, etc..). If this is your first time volunteering, for your safety and the safety of others, please let us know that you meet these requirements. 
 
Due to limited seating, please understand that confirmation of your reservation is required for you to attend. To request a seat, send us a note to volunteer@auwahi.org and we will respond to your request by Monday, April 2, 2018. 

Where: Meet at ʻUlupalakua Ranch Store. Please park behind store and bring all your gear.

When: Saturday, April 7, 2018  8:00 AM - 4:00 PM

What to bring: Due to the rough and steep terrain, we require hiking boots that cover the ankle, and unfortunately, we will have to turn folks away without proper boots. We have some extra boots you can borrow but please bring your own socks. Long pants are also recommended to protect against the dense understory brush. Please bring a back pack with layered clothing rain gear, two liters of water, lunch, sunscreen and a hat. Please clean all your gear, backpacks and boots to leave hitchhiking seeds behind.

Located on and sponsored by `Ulupalakua Ranch, the Auwahi Project (www.auwahi.org) protects one of the last diverse tracts of dryland forest in the archipelago. We are a community based project, in large part, dependent on the contributions of the public, especially in terms of volunteerism for tree planting and other aspects of forest management. 

As usual, before leaving the ranch we will be decontaminating our boots with brushes to help prevent the spread of invasive plants and using alcohol to avoid the potential spread of rapid `ōhi`a death (ROD) and other potential pathogens that can threaten our native Hawaiian forests. 

Mahalo no,

Auwahi Forest Restoration `ohana

View Event →
Mar
17
8:00 AM08:00

Volunteer trip March 17, 2018

unnamed.jpg

The Auwahi project seeks to restore and ecologically stabilize highly diverse but degraded forests stands on ‘Ulupalakua Ranch on Haleakala’s southwest slopes. We are proud to announce that recently two of Auwahi’s staff, Project coordinator Erica vonAllmen and Project manager Art Medeiros, were among 164 experts globally that have received recognition for their expertise in ecological restoration and been designated as Certified Ecological Restoration Practitioners (CERP) by the Society of Ecological Restoration. 
 
The Society of Ecological Restoration is premised on the vision that ecological restoration has become a fundamental component of conservation and sustainable development programs globally providing communities with the opportunity to not only repair ecological damage, but also improve the human condition. The CERP program was developed by the Society of Ecological Restoration and associated international leaders in the field of restoration to rigorously standardize and validate restoration practitioners on an international scale.
 
Saturday, March 17th, we will continue our efforts to restore Maui’s dryland forests.
 
On our volunteer trips to Auwahi forest, we work as a team to plant native seedlings, pull weeds, and gather seeds. This particular trip though is going to be a little bit more physically challenging with more up and downs, uneven terrain, more bush crashing.

To volunteer with our program requires that you are in reasonably good physical condition with no major medical issues (heart conditions, asthma, bee allergies, diabetes, pregnancy, physical injuries, etc..). If this is your first time volunteering, for your safety and the safety of others, please let us know that you meet these requirements. 
 
Due to limited seating, please understand that confirmation of your reservation is required for you to attend. To request a seat, send us a note to volunteer@auwahi.org and we will respond to your request by Monday, March 12, 2018. 

Where: Meet at ʻUlupalakua Ranch Store. Please park behind store and bring all your gear.

When: Saturday, March 17, 2018  8:00 AM - 4:00 PM

What to bring: Due to the rough and steep terrain, we require hiking boots that cover the ankle, and unfortunately, we will have to turn folks away without proper boots. We have some extra boots you can borrow but please bring your own socks. Long pants are also recommended to protect against the dense understory brush. Please bring a back pack with layered clothing rain gear, two liters of water, lunch, sunscreen and a hat. Please clean all your gear, backpacks and boots to leave hitchhiking seeds behind.

Located on and sponsored by `Ulupalakua Ranch, the Auwahi Project (www.auwahi.org) protects one of the last diverse tracts of dryland forest in the archipelago. We are a community based project, in large part, dependent on the contributions of the public, especially in terms of volunteerism for tree planting and other aspects of forest management. 

As usual, before leaving the ranch we will be decontaminating our boots with brushes to help prevent the spread of invasive plants and using alcohol to avoid the potential spread of rapid `ōhi`a death (ROD) and other potential pathogens that can threaten our native Hawaiian forests. 

Mahalo no,

Auwahi Forest Restoration `ohana

View Event →
Feb
17
8:00 AM08:00

Volunteer trip February 17, 2018

c631c3f9-279f-44f9-a130-26c53268ef56.jpg

Some moments are almost too perfect.
The wind stops for a second, the atmosphere seems to change shape.
The most authentic type of unity between humans and nature can occur.

The reintroduction of keiki of a species on the razor edge of extinction (Alectryon macrococcusvar. auwahiensis) by a first time volunteer is one of those. The perfection and the sincere intention to do powerful good are amazing to witness.
 
On our volunteer trips to Auwahi forest, we work as a team to plant native seedlings, pull weeds, and gather seeds. This particular trip though is going to be a combination of planting and controlling invasive weeds meaning it will be a little bit more physically challenging with more up and downs, uneven terrain, more bush crashing.

To volunteer with our program requires that you are in reasonably good physical condition with no major medical issues (heart conditions, asthma, bee allergies, diabetes, pregnancy, physical injuries, etc..). If this is your first time volunteering, for your safety and the safety of others, please let us know that you meet these requirements. 
 
Due to limited seating, please understand that confirmation of your reservation is required for you to attend. To request a seat, send us a note to volunteer@auwahi.org and we will respond to your request by Monday, February 12, 2018. 

Where: Meet at ʻUlupalakua Ranch Store. Please park behind store and bring all your gear.

When: Saturday, February 17, 2018  8:00 AM - 4:00 PM

What to bring: Due to the rough and steep terrain, we require hiking boots that cover the ankle, and unfortunately, we will have to turn folks away without proper boots. We have some extra boots you can borrow but please bring your own socks. Long pants are also recommended to protect against the dense understory brush. Please bring a back pack with layered clothing rain gear, two liters of water, lunch, sunscreen and a hat. Please clean all your gear, backpacks and boots to leave hitchhiking seeds behind.

Located on and sponsored by `Ulupalakua Ranch, the Auwahi Project (www.auwahi.org) protects one of the last diverse tracts of dryland forest in the archipelago. We are a community based project, in large part, dependent on the contributions of the public, especially in terms of volunteerism for tree planting and other aspects of forest management. 

As usual, before leaving the ranch we will be decontaminating our boots with brushes to help prevent the spread of invasive plants and using alcohol to avoid the potential spread of rapid `ōhi`a death (ROD) and other potential pathogens that can threaten our native Hawaiian forests. 

Mahalo no,

Auwahi Forest Restoration `ohana

View Event →
Jan
20
8:00 AM08:00

Volunteer trip Saturday 1/20/2018

 The ancient  māmane  forests of Honua`ula...   This is the time of year when the  māmane  (Sophora chrysophylla) trees of Auwahi start to flower and light the country up, their canopies packed with cadmium yellow flowers.   Scraps of native forest patches scattered across the upland regions of the Honua’ula  moku (district) of southwest Haleakalā indicate that at one time a majestic band of  māmane forest extended across this slope. The  māmane  that grew in this forest was much larger than the dwarfed form that most people are familiar with that still occurs in the upper elevations of Haleakalā National Park. These were immense trees with trunk diameters as large as dining room tables. All these trees are now much reduced in size and vigor but at one time probably grew upwards of 30 feet, interlocking their canopies, covering the area that we now know only as empty pasture lands.    Māmane  flowers contain a sweet, light nectar nearly essential as an energy source, irresistible to native birds. In the past, this annual flowering probably provided an important energy burst for forest birds who must have come from far and wide for the important event.   Saturday January 20,  2018, we are heading back up to Auwahi.  On our volunteer trips to Auwahi forest, we work as a team to plant native seedlings, pull weeds, and gather seeds.  To volunteer with our program requires that you are in reasonably good physical condition with no major medical issues (heart conditions, asthma, bee allergies, diabetes, pregnancy, physical injuries, etc..). If this is your first time volunteering, for your safety and the safety of others, please let us know that you meet these requirements.    Due to limited seating, please understand that confirmation of your reservation is required for you to attend. To request a seat, send us a note to   volunteer@auwahi.org   and we will respond to your request by Monday, January 15, 2018.   Where: Meet at ʻUlupalakua Ranch Store. Please park behind store, bring all your gear, and we will head up by 4WD up to the restored forest at Auwahi  When: Saturday, January 20, 2018  8:00 AM - 4:00 PM  Located on and sponsored by `Ulupalakua Ranch, the Auwahi Project ( www.auwahi.org ) protects one of the last diverse tracts of dryland forest in the archipelago. We are a community based project, in large part, dependent on the contributions of the public, especially in terms of volunteerism for tree planting and other aspects of forest management.   Due to the rough and steep terrain, we require hiking boots that cover the ankle, and unfortunately, we will have to turn folks away without proper boots. We have some extra boots you can borrow but please bring your own socks. Plan to pack layered clothing, rain gear, two liters of water, lunch, sunscreen and a hat. Please clean all your gear, backpacks and boots to leave hitchhiking seeds behind.  As usual, before leaving the ranch we will be decontaminating our boots with brushes to help prevent the spread of invasive plants and using alcohol to avoid the potential spread of rapid `ōhi`a death (ROD) and other potential pathogens that can threaten our native Hawaiian forests.   Mahalo no,  Auwahi Forest Restoration `ohana

The ancient māmane forests of Honua`ula...


This is the time of year when the māmane (Sophora chrysophylla) trees of Auwahi start to flower and light the country up, their canopies packed with cadmium yellow flowers.
 
Scraps of native forest patches scattered across the upland regions of the Honua’ula moku(district) of southwest Haleakalā indicate that at one time a majestic band of māmaneforest extended across this slope. The māmane that grew in this forest was much larger than the dwarfed form that most people are familiar with that still occurs in the upper elevations of Haleakalā National Park. These were immense trees with trunk diameters as large as dining room tables. All these trees are now much reduced in size and vigor but at one time probably grew upwards of 30 feet, interlocking their canopies, covering the area that we now know only as empty pasture lands.
 
Māmane flowers contain a sweet, light nectar nearly essential as an energy source, irresistible to native birds. In the past, this annual flowering probably provided an important energy burst for forest birds who must have come from far and wide for the important event.
 
Saturday January 20,  2018, we are heading back up to Auwahi.

On our volunteer trips to Auwahi forest, we work as a team to plant native seedlings, pull weeds, and gather seeds.

To volunteer with our program requires that you are in reasonably good physical condition with no major medical issues (heart conditions, asthma, bee allergies, diabetes, pregnancy, physical injuries, etc..). If this is your first time volunteering, for your safety and the safety of others, please let us know that you meet these requirements. 
 
Due to limited seating, please understand that confirmation of your reservation is required for you to attend. To request a seat, send us a note to volunteer@auwahi.org and we will respond to your request by Monday, January 15, 2018. 

Where: Meet at ʻUlupalakua Ranch Store. Please park behind store, bring all your gear, and we will head up by 4WD up to the restored forest at Auwahi

When: Saturday, January 20, 2018  8:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Located on and sponsored by `Ulupalakua Ranch, the Auwahi Project (www.auwahi.org) protects one of the last diverse tracts of dryland forest in the archipelago. We are a community based project, in large part, dependent on the contributions of the public, especially in terms of volunteerism for tree planting and other aspects of forest management. 

Due to the rough and steep terrain, we require hiking boots that cover the ankle, and unfortunately, we will have to turn folks away without proper boots. We have some extra boots you can borrow but please bring your own socks. Plan to pack layered clothing, rain gear, two liters of water, lunch, sunscreen and a hat. Please clean all your gear, backpacks and boots to leave hitchhiking seeds behind.

As usual, before leaving the ranch we will be decontaminating our boots with brushes to help prevent the spread of invasive plants and using alcohol to avoid the potential spread of rapid `ōhi`a death (ROD) and other potential pathogens that can threaten our native Hawaiian forests. 

Mahalo no,

Auwahi Forest Restoration `ohana

View Event →