May
20
8:00 am08:00

Volunteer Trip- May 20, 2017

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Auwahi volunteer trip
Saturday May 20, 2017


Though increasingly rare, maua remains a beautiful and conspicuous component of leeward slopes of most of the main Hawaiian islands. The pink, magenta, and chartreuse liko (young leaves) of the maua gathered in the canopies of large trees seasonally create some of the most striking and colorful displays of Hawaiian forests.

Ethnobotanically, virtually nothing has been documented about the uses of maua (Xylosma hawaiiense) by the early Hawaiians save for a reference in an early dictionary as a favored wood for poi boards. As the tree produces hard, durable wood, this lack of documentation of usage likely reflects the relatively poor state of knowledge capture during the late 1700s and early 1800s. On Maui, a second name has been recorded, a’e, though this name is also shared by other tree species.
 

On southern Haleakala, maua grows in the wild from Kanaio, with its smaller, more bonsai shrubby trees, to the larger 30 foot individuals that thrive in the richer soils of Auwahi and Luala’ilua. Thanks to Anna Palomino’s magic touch, we have an unprecedented batch ofmaua seedling that need your help on May 20th, in being returned to their native home.  If you have the time, please consider joining us.

 
As usual, before leaving the ranch we will be decontaminating our boots with brushes to help prevent the spread of invasive plants and using alcohol to avoid the potential spread of rapid `ōhi`a death (ROD) and potentially other pathogens that can threaten our native Hawaiian forests. 

 Where: ʻUlupalakua Ranch Store     

 

When: Saturday, May 20, 2017    8:00 AM - 4:00 PM

 

Due to the rough and steep terrain, WE REQUIRE HIKING BOOTS TO BE WORN THAT COVER THE ANKLE, and unfortunately, we will have to turn folks away without proper boots. We have some extra boots you can borrow but please bring your own socks. Plan to pack layered clothing, rain gear, two liters of water, lunch, sunscreen and a hat. Please clean all your gear, backpacks and boots to leave hitchhiking seeds behind.
 

We have a limited number of 4wheel drive vehicles and, as a result, limited room for volunteers. Please don't let this discourage you from signing up but we do ask for your understanding for not being able to accommodate everyone who wants to volunteer.
 

Mahalo no,
 

Auwahi Forest Restoration `ohana

Oct
22
8:00 am08:00

Volunteer Trip- October 22, 2016

Auwahi volunteer trip
October 22, 2016

 

A culture is no better than its woods.”- W.H. Auden

 
One of the most charismatic of the native Hawaiian trees found at Auwahi is the red-flowered Haleakala sandalwood (Santalum haleakalae var. lanaiense). All species of sandalwood are referred to in Hawaiian as `iliahi or la`au `ala, the latter literally ‘fragrant plant’. The yellow flowered Santalum ellipticum, especially those shrubby forms near the coast, are `iliahi alo’e.
 
The red-flowered Haleakala sandalwood, shown here, is one of our Nation’s rarest trees, and as such, is recognized as Endangered by the US Fish and Wildlife Service. Ethnobotanically, Hawaiians used the wood of `iliahi for thepola (platform of a double canoe), the powdered heartwood to perfume theirkapa (tapa or bark cloth), and other parts in dyeing kapa a distinctive reddish-brown.
 
On October 22, we head back up to Auwahi to care for the homes of our native Hawaiian trees. We’ll be planting trees, pulling some weeds, and gathering seeds. 2016 has turned out to be a banner year for some species, includingolopua and `iliahi, in producing seeds. If you have the time, please consider joining us.
 
As usual, before leaving the ranch we will be decontaminating our boots with brushes to help prevent the spread of invasive plants and using alcohol to avoid the potential spread of rapid `ōhi`a death (ROD) and potentially other pathogens that can threaten our native Hawaiian forests. 

  

Where: ʻUlupalakua Ranch Store     

 

When: Saturday, October 22,  8:00 AM - 4:00 PM

 

Due to the rough and steep terrain, WE REQUIRE HIKING BOOTS TO BE WORN THAT COVER THE ANKLE, and unfortunately, we will have to turn folks away without proper boots. We have some extra boots you can borrow but please bring your own socks. Plan to pack layered clothing, rain gear, two liters of water, lunch, sunscreen and a hat. Please clean all your gear, backpacks and boots to leave hitchhiking seeds behind.
 

We have a limited number of 4-wheel drive vehicles and, as a result, limited room for volunteers. Please don't let this discourage you from signing up but we do ask for your understanding for not being able to accommodate everyone who wants to volunteer. And of course, mahalo loa for all the years of enthusiastic support given by the people of Maui towards our common vision of community-based stewardship of our native forests.
 

Mahalo no,
 

Auwahi Forest Restoration `ohana

Jul
23
8:00 am08:00

Volunteer Trip-July 23, 2016

`ūlei, ihe pahe`e, and our next volunteer trip

July 23, 2016

“The `ūlei was a tree whose wood was highly valued for its toughness, and of it were made thick, heavy darts, ihe pahe`e- for skating over the ground in a game of that name.”

Hawaiian Antiquities, Mo`olelo Hawaii (1898), David Malo

“What are those long things hanging up there on the side of the house?” The retainers replied: “They are pahe`e spears.” Lonoikamakahiki again asked them: “What are they used for?” The retainers then told him: “When two men wish to wager certain articles of value, they would proceed to the pahe`e grounds and upon arriving at the place they would decide first as to the wager, whether it be articles of value or pieces of land. If they do not wager these things, then they would put up other things, such as their bones, meaning their lives. After the bets are agreed on, they would then proceed to play the game of pahe`e. … Sometimes the articles of value would be so great that it would take three and four houses to hold them all.”

Hawaiian Antiquities and Folk-Lore (1917), A. Fornander

On Saturday July 23, we are returning to plant more trees to protect the home of the `ūlei (Osteomeles anthyllidifolia) and many other plant species resident to the southern slopes of Haleakalā.

To volunteer with us that day, we have a few requirements (besides bringing your pahe`e darts and cherished items for betting)...

Above-the-ankle hiking boots are required. We have extra boots for borrowing (let us know ahead of time) but please bring your own socks. Please clean all your gear, backpacks and boots to leave hitchhiking seeds behind. We are now sanitizing all hiking boots, tools, and gear with a 70% alcohol solution prior to heading to Auwahi forest as a preventive measure to protect the forest from foreign pathogens. Plan to pack layered clothing, rain gear, at least two liters of water, lunch, sunscreen, and a hat.

Where: `Ulupalakua Ranch Store (contact us if you need directions)

When: Saturday, July 23, 8:00 AM-4:00 PM

Please request a seat at latest by Friday July 15 by sending us an email at volunteer@auwahiforest.org. Unfortunately, we are not able to honor all requests to participate as we have limited seats in our 4WD vehicles.

mahalo loa for your support of Auwahi forest,

Auwahi Forest Restoration Project